What's New (past 30 days)


Date of Last GEDCOM Import: 29 Jan 2014 20:35:30

Photos

 Thumb   Description   Linked to   Last Modified 
Aldrich, Virginia R.
Aldrich, Virginia R.
Virginia Rose Aldrich 
  30 Sep 2014
Angel Babies
Angel Babies
An Angel for Babies who passed but have no photo 
  30 Sep 2014
The White House
The White House
The White House, Washington D.C.
On Saturday, November 1, 1800, John Adams became the first president to take residence in the building.[13] During Adams' second day in the house, he wrote a letter to his wife Abigail, containing a prayer for the house. Adams wrote:

I pray Heaven to bestow the best of blessings on this House, and all that shall hereafter inhabit it. May none but honest and wise men ever rule under this roof. 
  30 Sep 2014
President Barack H. Obama
President Barack H. Obama
Barack Obama

Barack H. Obama is the 44th President of the United States.

His story is the American story — values from the heartland, a middle-class upbringing in a strong family, hard work and education as the means of getting ahead, and the conviction that a life so blessed should be lived in service to others.

With a father from Kenya and a mother from Kansas, President Obama was born in Hawaii on August 4, 1961. He was raised with help from his grandfather, who served in Patton's army, and his grandmother, who worked her way up from the secretarial pool to middle management at a bank.

After working his way through college with the help of scholarships and student loans, President Obama moved to Chicago, where he worked with a group of churches to help rebuild communities devastated by the closure of local steel plants.

He went on to attend law school, where he became the first African—American president of the Harvard Law Review. Upon graduation, he returned to Chicago to help lead a voter registration drive, teach constitutional law at the University of Chicago, and remain active in his community.

President Obama's years of public service are based around his unwavering belief in the ability to unite people around a politics of purpose. In the Illinois State Senate, he passed the first major ethics reform in 25 years, cut taxes for working families, and expanded health care for children and their parents. As a United States Senator, he reached across the aisle to pass groundbreaking lobbying reform, lock up the world's most dangerous weapons, and bring transparency to government by putting federal spending online.

He was elected the 44th President of the United States on November 4, 2008, and sworn in on January 20, 2009. He and his wife, Michelle, are the proud parents of two daughters, Malia, 14, and Sasha, 11.
http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/barackobama 
  30 Sep 2014
President George W. Bush
President George W. Bush
George W. Bush

The airborne terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and the thwarted flight against the White House or Capitol on September 11, 2001, in which nearly 3,000 Americans were killed, transformed George W. Bush into a wartime president. The attacks put on hold many of Bush’s hopes and plans, and Bush’s father, George Bush, the 41st president, declared that his son “faced the greatest challenge of any president since Abraham Lincoln.”

In response, Bush formed a new cabinet-level Department of Homeland Security, sent American forces into Afghanistan to break up the Taliban, a movement under Osama bin Laden that trained financed and exported terrorist teams. The Taliban was successfully disrupted but Bin Laden was not captured and was still on the loose as Bush began his second term. Following the attacks, the president also recast the nation’s intelligence gathering and analysis services, and ordered reform of the military forces to meet the new enemy. At the same time he delivered major tax cuts which had been a campaign pledge. His most controversial act was the invasion of Iraq on the belief that Iraqi President Saddam Hussein posed a grave threat to the United States. Saddam was captured, but the disruption of Iraq and the killing of American servicemen and friendly Iraqis by insurgents became the challenge of Bush’s government as he began his second term. President Bush pledged during his 2005 State of the Union Address that the United States would help the Iraqi people establish a fully democratic government because the victory of freedom in Iraq would strengthen a new ally in the war on terror, bring hope to a troubled region, and lift a threat from the lives of future generations.

Bush was born in New Haven, Connecticut while his father was attending Yale University after service in World War II. The family moved to Midland, Texas, where the senior Bush entered the oil exploration business. The son spent formative years there, attended Midland public schools, and formed friendships that stayed with him into the White House. Bush graduated from Yale, received a business degree from Harvard, and then returned to Midland where he too got into the oil business. In Midland he met and married Laura Welch, a teacher and librarian. They had twin daughters, Jenna and Barbara, now out of college and pursuing careers.

When George W. Bush, at the age of 54, became the 43rd president of the United States, it was only the second time in American history that a president’s son went on to the White House. John Quincy Adams, elected the sixth president in 1824, was the son of John Adams, the second president. While John Adams had groomed his son to be president, George Bush, the 41st president, insisted he was surprised when the eldest of his six children became interested in politics, became governor of Texas, and then went on to the White House.

During the early part of the 2000 campaign for the White House, Bush enjoyed a double-digit lead in the polls over his opponent Vice President Al Gore Jr. But the gap closed as the election approached and though Gore finally won the popular vote by 543,895 votes, victory or loss of the presidency hinged on Florida’s electoral votes. That struggle through recounts and lawsuits worked its way to the Supreme Court. In the end Bush won the electoral count 271 to 266. His new administration was focused on “compassionate conservatism,” which embraced excellence in education, tax relief and volunteerism among faith-based and community organizations.

Bush was challenged in his re-election bid in 2004 by Massachusetts Democratic Senator John Kerry. The election was a good contest, but Bush’s contention that the invasion of Iraq had made the world more secure against terrorism won the national political debate. Bush was re-elected with 51 percent to 48 percent.

On the inaugural stand, George W. Bush set the theme for his second term: “At this second gathering, our duties are defined not by the words I use, but by the history we have seen together. For half a century, America defended our own freedom by standing watch on distant borders. After the shipwreck of communism came years of relative quiet- and then there came a day of fire. There is only one force of history that can break the reign of hatred and resentment, and expose the pretensions of tyrants, and reward the hopes of the decent and tolerant, and that is the force of human freedom – tested but not weary… we are ready for the greatest achievements in the history of freedom.”

The Presidential biographies on WhiteHouse.gov are from “The Presidents of the United States of America,” by Frank Freidel and Hugh Sidey. Copyright 2006 by the White House Historical Association
http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/georgewbush 
  30 Sep 2014
President Bill Clinton
President Bill Clinton
William J. Clinton

During the administration of William Jefferson Clinton, the U.S. enjoyed more peace and economic well being than at any time in its history. He was the first Democratic president since Franklin D. Roosevelt to win a second term. He could point to the lowest unemployment rate in modern times, the lowest inflation in 30 years, the highest home ownership in the country's history, dropping crime rates in many places, and reduced welfare rolls. He proposed the first balanced budget in decades and achieved a budget surplus. As part of a plan to celebrate the millennium in 2000, Clinton called for a great national initiative to end racial discrimination.

After the failure in his second year of a huge program of health care reform, Clinton shifted emphasis, declaring "the era of big government is over." He sought legislation to upgrade education, to protect jobs of parents who must care for sick children, to restrict handgun sales, and to strengthen environmental rules.

President Clinton was born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946, in Hope, Arkansas, three months after his father died in a traffic accident. When he was four years old, his mother wed Roger Clinton, of Hot Springs, Arkansas. In high school, he took the family name.

He excelled as a student and as a saxophone player and once considered becoming a professional musician. As a delegate to Boys Nation while in high school, he met President John Kennedy in the White House Rose Garden. The encounter led him to enter a life of public service.

Clinton was graduated from Georgetown University and in 1968 won a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford University. He received a law degree from Yale University in 1973, and entered politics in Arkansas.

He was defeated in his campaign for Congress in Arkansas's Third District in 1974. The next year he married Hillary Rodham, a graduate of Wellesley College and Yale Law School. In 1980, Chelsea, their only child, was born.

Clinton was elected Arkansas Attorney General in 1976, and won the governorship in 1978. After losing a bid for a second term, he regained the office four years later, and served until he defeated incumbent George Bush and third party candidate Ross Perot in the 1992 presidential race.

Clinton and his running mate, Tennessee's Senator Albert Gore Jr., then 44, represented a new generation in American political leadership. For the first time in 12 years both the White House and Congress were held by the same party. But that political edge was brief; the Republicans won both houses of Congress in 1994.

In 1998, as a result of issues surrounding personal indiscretions with a young woman White House intern, Clinton was the second U.S. president to be impeached by the House of Representatives. He was tried in the Senate and found not guilty of the charges brought against him. He apologized to the nation for his actions and continued to have unprecedented popular approval ratings for his job as president.

In the world, he successfully dispatched peace keeping forces to war-torn Bosnia and bombed Iraq when Saddam Hussein stopped United Nations inspections for evidence of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons. He became a global proponent for an expanded NATO, more open international trade, and a worldwide campaign against drug trafficking. He drew huge crowds when he traveled through South America, Europe, Russia, Africa, and China, advocating U.S. style freedom.

The Presidential biographies on WhiteHouse.gov are from “The Presidents of the United States of America,” by Frank Freidel and Hugh Sidey. Copyright 2006 by the White House Historical Association.
http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/williamjclinton 
  30 Sep 2014
President George H.W. Bush
President George H.W. Bush
George H. W. Bush

George Bush brought to the White House a dedication to traditional American values and a determination to direct them toward making the United States "a kinder and gentler nation." In his Inaugural Address he pledged in "a moment rich with promise" to use American strength as "a force for good."

Coming from a family with a tradition of public service, George Herbert Walker Bush felt the responsibility to make his contribution both in time of war and in peace. Born in Milton, Massachusetts, on June 12, 1924, he became a student leader at Phillips Academy in Andover. On his 18th birthday he enlisted in the armed forces. The youngest pilot in the Navy when he received his wings, he flew 58 combat missions during World War II. On one mission over the Pacific as a torpedo bomber pilot he was shot down by Japanese antiaircraft fire and was rescued from the water by a U. S. submarine. He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for bravery in action.

Bush next turned his energies toward completing his education and raising a family. In January 1945 he married Barbara Pierce. They had six children-- George, Robin (who died as a child), John (known as Jeb), Neil, Marvin, and Dorothy.

At Yale University he excelled both in sports and in his studies; he was captain of the baseball team and a member of Phi Beta Kappa. After graduation Bush embarked on a career in the oil industry of West Texas.

Like his father, Prescott Bush, who was elected a Senator from Connecticut in 1952, George became interested in public service and politics. He served two terms as a Representative to Congress from Texas. Twice he ran unsuccessfully for the Senate. Then he was appointed to a series of high-level positions: Ambassador to the United Nations, Chairman of the Republican National Committee, Chief of the U. S. Liaison Office in the People's Republic of China, and Director of the Central Intelligence Agency.

In 1980 Bush campaigned for the Republican nomination for President. He lost, but was chosen as a running mate by Ronald Reagan. As Vice President, Bush had responsibility in several domestic areas, including Federal deregulation and anti-drug programs, and visited scores of foreign countries. In 1988 Bush won the Republican nomination for President and, with Senator Dan Quayle of Indiana as his running mate, he defeated Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis in the general election.

Bush faced a dramatically changing world, as the Cold War ended after 40 bitter years, the Communist empire broke up, and the Berlin Wall fell. The Soviet Union ceased to exist; and reformist President Mikhail Gorbachev, whom Bush had supported, resigned. While Bush hailed the march of democracy, he insisted on restraint in U. S. policy toward the group of new nations.

In other areas of foreign policy, President Bush sent American troops into Panama to overthrow the corrupt regime of General Manuel Noriega, who was threatening the security of the canal and the Americans living there. Noriega was brought to the United States for trial as a drug trafficker.

Bush's greatest test came when Iraqi President Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait, then threatened to move into Saudi Arabia. Vowing to free Kuwait, Bush rallied the United Nations, the U. S. people, and Congress and sent 425,000 American troops. They were joined by 118,000 troops from allied nations. After weeks of air and missile bombardment, the 100-hour land battle dubbed Desert Storm routed Iraq's million-man army.

Despite unprecedented popularity from this military and diplomatic triumph, Bush was unable to withstand discontent at home from a faltering economy, rising violence in inner cities, and continued high deficit spending. In 1992 he lost his bid for reelection to Democrat William Clinton.

The Presidential biographies on WhiteHouse.gov are from “The Presidents of the United States of America,” by Frank Freidel and Hugh Sidey. Copyright 2006 by the White House Historical Association
http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/georgehwbush 
  30 Sep 2014
President Ronald Reagan
President Ronald Reagan
Ronald Reagan

At the end of his two terms in office, Ronald Reagan viewed with satisfaction the achievements of his innovative program known as the Reagan Revolution, which aimed to reinvigorate the American people and reduce their reliance upon Government. He felt he had fulfilled his campaign pledge of 1980 to restore "the great, confident roar of American progress and growth and optimism."

On February 6, 1911, Ronald Wilson Reagan was born to Nelle and John Reagan in Tampico, Illinois. He attended high school in nearby Dixon and then worked his way through Eureka College. There, he studied economics and sociology, played on the football team, and acted in school plays. Upon graduation, he became a radio sports announcer. A screen test in 1937 won him a contract in Hollywood. During the next two decades he appeared in 53 films.

From his first marriage to actress Jane Wyman, he had two children, Maureen and Michael. Maureen passed away in 2001. In 1952 he married Nancy Davis, who was also an actress, and they had two children, Patricia Ann and Ronald Prescott.

As president of the Screen Actors Guild, Reagan became embroiled in disputes over the issue of Communism in the film industry; his political views shifted from liberal to conservative. He toured the country as a television host, becoming a spokesman for conservatism. In 1966 he was elected Governor of California by a margin of a million votes; he was re-elected in 1970.

Ronald Reagan won the Republican Presidential nomination in 1980 and chose as his running mate former Texas Congressman and United Nations Ambassador George Bush. Voters troubled by inflation and by the year-long confinement of Americans in Iran swept the Republican ticket into office. Reagan won 489 electoral votes to 49 for President Jimmy Carter.

On January 20, 1981, Reagan took office. Only 69 days later he was shot by a would-be assassin, but quickly recovered and returned to duty. His grace and wit during the dangerous incident caused his popularity to soar.

Dealing skillfully with Congress, Reagan obtained legislation to stimulate economic growth, curb inflation, increase employment, and strengthen national defense. He embarked upon a course of cutting taxes and Government expenditures, refusing to deviate from it when the strengthening of defense forces led to a large deficit.

A renewal of national self-confidence by 1984 helped Reagan and Bush win a second term with an unprecedented number of electoral votes. Their victory turned away Democratic challengers Walter F. Mondale and Geraldine Ferraro.

In 1986 Reagan obtained an overhaul of the income tax code, which eliminated many deductions and exempted millions of people with low incomes. At the end of his administration, the Nation was enjoying its longest recorded period of peacetime prosperity without recession or depression.

In foreign policy, Reagan sought to achieve "peace through strength." During his two terms he increased defense spending 35 percent, but sought to improve relations with the Soviet Union. In dramatic meetings with Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, he negotiated a treaty that would eliminate intermediate-range nuclear missiles. Reagan declared war against international terrorism, sending American bombers against Libya after evidence came out that Libya was involved in an attack on American soldiers in a West Berlin nightclub.

By ordering naval escorts in the Persian Gulf, he maintained the free flow of oil during the Iran-Iraq war. In keeping with the Reagan Doctrine, he gave support to anti-Communist insurgencies in Central America, Asia, and Africa.

Overall, the Reagan years saw a restoration of prosperity, and the goal of peace through strength seemed to be within grasp.

The Presidential biographies on WhiteHouse.gov are from “The Presidents of the United States of America,” by Frank Freidel and Hugh Sidey. Copyright 2006 by the White House Historical Association.
http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/ronaldreagan 
  30 Sep 2014
President Jimmy Carter
President Jimmy Carter
James Carter

Jimmy Carter aspired to make Government "competent and compassionate," responsive to the American people and their expectations. His achievements were notable, but in an era of rising energy costs, mounting inflation, and continuing tensions, it was impossible for his administration to meet these high expectations.

Carter, who has rarely used his full name--James Earl Carter, Jr.--was born October 1, 1924, in Plains, Georgia. Peanut farming, talk of politics, and devotion to the Baptist faith were mainstays of his upbringing. Upon graduation in 1946 from the Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, Carter married Rosalynn Smith. The Carters have three sons, John William (Jack), James Earl III (Chip), Donnel Jeffrey (Jeff), and a daughter, Amy Lynn.

After seven years' service as a naval officer, Carter returned to Plains. In 1962 he entered state politics, and eight years later he was elected Governor of Georgia. Among the new young southern governors, he attracted attention by emphasizing ecology, efficiency in government, and the removal of racial barriers.

Carter announced his candidacy for President in December 1974 and began a two-year campaign that gradually gained momentum. At the Democratic Convention, he was nominated on the first ballot. He chose Senator Walter F. Mondale of Minnesota as his running mate. Carter campaigned hard against President Gerald R. Ford, debating with him three times. Carter won by 297 electoral votes to 241 for Ford.

Carter worked hard to combat the continuing economic woes of inflation and unemployment. By the end of his administration, he could claim an increase of nearly eight million jobs and a decrease in the budget deficit, measured in percentage of the gross national product. Unfortunately, inflation and interest rates were at near record highs, and efforts to reduce them caused a short recession.

Carter could point to a number of achievements in domestic affairs. He dealt with the energy shortage by establishing a national energy policy and by decontrolling domestic petroleum prices to stimulate production. He prompted Government efficiency through civil service reform and proceeded with deregulation of the trucking and airline industries. He sought to improve the environment. His expansion of the national park system included protection of 103 million acres of Alaskan lands. To increase human and social services, he created the Department of Education, bolstered the Social Security system, and appointed record numbers of women, blacks, and Hispanics to Government jobs.

In foreign affairs, Carter set his own style. His championing of human rights was coldly received by the Soviet Union and some other nations. In the Middle East, through the Camp David agreement of 1978, he helped bring amity between Egypt and Israel. He succeeded in obtaining ratification of the Panama Canal treaties. Building upon the work of predecessors, he established full diplomatic relations with the People's Republic of China and completed negotiation of the SALT II nuclear limitation treaty with the Soviet Union.

There were serious setbacks, however. The Soviet invasion of Afghanistan caused the suspension of plans for ratification of the SALT II pact. The seizure as hostages of the U. S. embassy staff in Iran dominated the news during the last 14 months of the administration. The consequences of Iran's holding Americans captive, together with continuing inflation at home, contributed to Carter's defeat in 1980. Even then, he continued the difficult negotiations over the hostages. Iran finally released the 52 Americans the same day Carter left office.

The Presidential biographies on WhiteHouse.gov are from “The Presidents of the United States of America,” by Frank Freidel and Hugh Sidey. Copyright 2006 by the White House Historical Association.
http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/jimmycarter 
  30 Sep 2014
President Gerald R Ford
President Gerald R Ford
Gerald R. Ford

When Gerald R. Ford took the oath of office on August 9, 1974, he declared, "I assume the Presidency under extraordinary circumstances.... This is an hour of history that troubles our minds and hurts our hearts."

It was indeed an unprecedented time. He had been the first Vice President chosen under the terms of the Twenty-fifth Amendment and, in the aftermath of the Watergate scandal, was succeeding the first President ever to resign.

Ford was confronted with almost insuperable tasks. There were the challenges of mastering inflation, reviving a depressed economy, solving chronic energy shortages, and trying to ensure world peace.

The President acted to curb the trend toward Government intervention and spending as a means of solving the problems of American society and the economy. In the long run, he believed, this shift would bring a better life for all Americans.

Ford's reputation for integrity and openness had made him popular during his 25 years in Congress. From 1965 to 1973, he was House Minority Leader. Born in Omaha, Nebraska, in 1913, he grew up in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He starred on the University of Michigan football team, then went to Yale, where he served as assistant coach while earning his law degree. During World War II he attained the rank of lieutenant commander in the Navy. After the war he returned to Grand Rapids, where he began the practice of law, and entered Republican politics. A few weeks before his election to Congress in 1948, he married Elizabeth Bloomer. They have four children: Michael, John, Steven, and Susan.

As President, Ford tried to calm earlier controversies by granting former President Nixon a full pardon. His nominee for Vice President, former Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York, was the second person to fill that office by appointment. Gradually, Ford selected a cabinet of his own.

Ford established his policies during his first year in office, despite opposition from a heavily Democratic Congress. His first goal was to curb inflation. Then, when recession became the Nation's most serious domestic problem, he shifted to measures aimed at stimulating the economy. But, still fearing inflation, Ford vetoed a number of non-military appropriations bills that would have further increased the already heavy budgetary deficit. During his first 14 months as President he vetoed 39 measures. His vetoes were usually sustained.

Ford continued as he had in his Congressional days to view himself as "a moderate in domestic affairs, a conservative in fiscal affairs, and a dyed-in-the-wool internationalist in foreign affairs." A major goal was to help business operate more freely by reducing taxes upon it and easing the controls exercised by regulatory agencies. "We...declared our independence 200 years ago, and we are not about to lose it now to paper shufflers and computers," he said.

In foreign affairs Ford acted vigorously to maintain U. S. power and prestige after the collapse of Cambodia and South Viet Nam. Preventing a new war in the Middle East remained a major objective; by providing aid to both Israel and Egypt, the Ford Administration helped persuade the two countries to accept an interim truce agreement. Detente with the Soviet Union continued. President Ford and Soviet leader Leonid I. Brezhnev set new limitations upon nuclear weapons.

President Ford won the Republican nomination for the Presidency in 1976, but lost the election to his Democratic opponent, former Governor Jimmy Carter of Georgia.

On Inauguration Day, President Carter began his speech: "For myself and for our Nation, I want to thank my predecessor for all he has done to heal our land." A grateful people concurred.

The Presidential biographies on WhiteHouse.gov are from “The Presidents of the United States of America,” by Frank Freidel and Hugh Sidey. Copyright 2006 by the White House Historical Association.
http://www.whitehouse.gov/about/presidents/geraldford 
  30 Sep 2014

Documents

 Thumb   Description   Linked to   Last Modified 
Yearbook, Cooper Janice I
Yearbook, Cooper Janice I
Yearbook, Cooper Janice I 
  19 Sep 2014
Yearbook, Cooper Janice I
Yearbook, Cooper Janice I
Yearbook, Cooper Janice I 
  19 Sep 2014
Family Tree, Harris (Handwritten)
Family Tree, Harris (Handwritten)
Family Tree, Harris (Handwritten) 
  17 Sep 2014
Birth Certificate, Joseph Daniel Harris
Birth Certificate, Joseph Daniel Harris
Birth Certificate, Joseph Daniel Harris 
  17 Sep 2014
Memorial Card, Joseph Daniel Harris
Memorial Card, Joseph Daniel Harris
Memorial Card, Joseph Daniel Harris 
  17 Sep 2014
Death Certificate, Joseph Daniel Harris
Death Certificate, Joseph Daniel Harris
Death Certificate, Joseph Daniel Harris 
  17 Sep 2014
Obituary, Joseph Daniel Harris
Obituary, Joseph Daniel Harris
Obituary, Joseph Daniel Harris 
  17 Sep 2014
Mansker, Benjamin F & Ada Marie Shields Marriage Certificate
Mansker, Benjamin F & Ada Marie Shields Marriage Certificate
Mansker, Benjamin F & Ada Marie Shields Marriage Certificate 
  17 Sep 2014
Birth Certificate, Hazel M Sturdevant
Birth Certificate, Hazel M Sturdevant
Birth Certificate, Hazel M Sturdevant 
  12 Sep 2014
Obituary, Fink, Toni L. (Aldrich)
Obituary, Fink, Toni L. (Aldrich)
Obituary, Fink, Toni L. (Aldrich) 
  9 Sep 2014

Headstones

 Thumb   Description   Cemetery   Status   Linked to   Last Modified 

Burial:
New Gilead Reformed Cemetery
Concord (Cabarrus County)
Cabarrus County
North Carolina, USA 
 Located    30 Sep 2014
in-loving-memory.jpg
in-loving-memory.jpg
In Loving Memory (for those with no headstone or an unmarked or unknown grave) 
UNKNOWN Unmarked    30 Sep 2014

Burial:
Restland Memorial Park
Dallas
Dallas County
Texas, USA
Plot: Rose Garden 
 Located    21 Sep 2014

Burial:
Greenbrier Burial Park
Hinton
Summers County
West Virginia, USA 
 Located    21 Sep 2014

Metts, Linder L.
Burial:
Memphis Funeral Home and Memorial Gardens
Bartlett
Shelby County
Tennessee, USA 
 Located    21 Sep 2014

Shinn, John D.
Burial:
Freedom Missionary Baptist Church Cemetery
Warsaw
Benton County
Missouri, USA 
 Located    20 Sep 2014

Shinn, John D.
Burial:
Freedom Missionary Baptist Church Cemetery
Warsaw
Benton County
Missouri, USA
 
 Located    20 Sep 2014

Burial:
Prairie Home Cemetery
Esbon
Jewell County
Kansas, USA
 
 Located    19 Sep 2014

Burial:
Port Williams Cemetery
Williams (Lawrence County)
Lawrence County
Indiana, USA 
 Located    19 Sep 2014

Burial:
Jacksonville Memory Gardens
Orange Park
Clay County
Florida, USA
Plot: 142-D 
 Located    17 Sep 2014

Histories

 Thumb   Description   Linked to   Last Modified 
usarmy.jpg
usarmy.jpg
U.S. Army Flag 
  30 Sep 2014
Immigrated to America
Immigrated to America
Ship to use for persons whom Immigrated to America

Notes: Any person who came to America before 1890 would have never seen the Statue of Liberty.  
  30 Sep 2014
England Flag
England Flag
Signifies Ancestor or Immigrant was born in England 
  30 Sep 2014
British American
British American
Signifies person was of British (english) ancestry, born in America
(Indicates ALL ancestors of this person were from England)  
  30 Sep 2014
French Flag
French Flag
Signifies Ancestor or Immigrant was born in France 
  30 Sep 2014
Presidential Seal
Presidential Seal
Presidential Seal
(Indicates this person was a President of the United States) 
  30 Sep 2014
Flag_of_Mississippi.png
Flag_of_Mississippi.png
Mississippi State Flag 
  21 Sep 2014
Korean War
Korean War
The Korean War (25 June 1950 – 27 July 1953) was a war between the Republic of Korea (South Korea), supported by the United Nations, and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea), at one time supported by China and the Soviet Union 
  20 Sep 2014
ww2warbadge.jpg
ww2warbadge.jpg
Badge for Person whom Served in WWII 
  17 Sep 2014
Maine News
Maine News
Newspaper article from Sanford Maine. Names mentioned were Gary Aldrich, Horace P. Aldrich and Horace G. Aldrich 
  17 Sep 2014

Census

 Thumb   Description   Linked to   Last Modified 
1790 U.S. Federal Census
1790 U.S. Federal Census
Source Citation: Year: 1790; Census Place: , Mecklenburg, North Carolina; Series: M637; Roll: 7; Page: 366; Image: 541; Family History Library Film: 0568147. 
  1 Oct 2014
U.S. Census Reconstructed Records, 1660-1820 about Jacob Shinn
U.S. Census Reconstructed Records, 1660-1820 about Jacob Shinn
U.S. Census Reconstructed Records, 1660-1820 about Jacob Shinn
 
  1 Oct 2014
1940 U.S. Federal Census Data for Metts, Linder L.
1940 U.S. Federal Census Data for Metts, Linder L.
Source Citation: Year: 1940; Census Place: , Lafayette, Mississippi; Roll: T627_2038; Page: 15A; Enumeration District: 36-15. 
  21 Sep 2014
1940 U.S. Federal Census
1940 U.S. Federal Census
Source Citation: Year: 1940; Census Place: Stark, Hickory, Missouri; Roll: T627_2111; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 43-6. 
  20 Sep 2014
1940 U.S. Federal Census Data for Cooper, Janice
1940 U.S. Federal Census Data for Cooper, Janice
Source Citation: Year: 1940; Census Place: Casper, Natrona, Wyoming; Roll: T627_4573; Page: 5A; Enumeration District: 13-13 
  19 Sep 2014
1940 U.S. Federal Census
1940 U.S. Federal Census
Source Citation: Year: 1940; Census Place: Pennington, Mercer, New Jersey; Roll: T627_2357; Page: 9A; Enumeration District: 11-58. 
  17 Sep 2014
1930 U.S. Federal Census
1930 U.S. Federal Census
Source Citation: Year: 1930; Census Place: Pennington, Mercer, New Jersey; Roll: 1362; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 0099; Image: 707.0; FHL microfilm: 2341097. 
  17 Sep 2014
1940 U.S. Federal Census Data for Edward H. Eaton
1940 U.S. Federal Census Data for Edward H. Eaton
Source Citation: Year: 1940; Census Place: Woonsocket, Providence, Rhode Island; Roll: T627_3770; Page: 4A; Enumeration District: 4-260 
  17 Sep 2014
1930 U.S. Federal Census Data for Edward H. Eaton
1930 U.S. Federal Census Data for Edward H. Eaton
Source Citation: Year: 1930; Census Place: Woonsocket, Providence, Rhode Island; Roll: 2181; Page: 21A; Enumeration District: 0280; Image: 152.0; FHL microfilm: 2341915. 
  17 Sep 2014
1940 U.S. Federal Census Data
1940 U.S. Federal Census Data
1940 U.S. Federal Census Data for Carl Amos 
  17 Sep 2014

Individuals

 ID   Last Name, Given Name(s)   Born/Christened   Tree   Last Modified 
I45346 
Shinn, Benjamin 
b. 1753  Hopewell, Frederick, Virginia  MRP Tree 1 Oct 2014
I49155 
Shinn, Joseph 
b. 27 Nov 1751  Hopewell, Frederick, Virginia  MRP Tree 1 Oct 2014
I26757 
Shinn, Moses 
b. 1790  Old Bethpage, Salisbury, Rowan, North Carolina  MRP Tree 1 Oct 2014
I35211 
Shinn, Jacob 
b. 13 May 1715  Springfield, Burlington, New Jersey  MRP Tree 1 Oct 2014
I11231 
Shinn, Buren Wayne 
b. 30 Sep 1945  Cabarrus, North Carolina  MRP Tree 30 Sep 2014
I11220 
Shinn, Buren Jeremiah 
b. 17 Feb 1908  Cabarrus, North Carolina  MRP Tree 30 Sep 2014
I11233 
Shinn, Duane Eugene 
b. (LIVING)   MRP Tree 30 Sep 2014
I11232 
Heintz, Nancy Kaye 
b. (LIVING)   MRP Tree 30 Sep 2014
I11234 
Shinn, Debra Kaye 
b. (LIVING)   MRP Tree 30 Sep 2014
I14364 
Gotschall, Sandra Sue 
b. 30 Jan 1938   MRP Tree 30 Sep 2014

Families

 ID   Father ID   Father's Name   Mother ID   Married   Tree   Last Modified 
 F46683          MRP Tree 1 Oct 2014
 F30399          MRP Tree 1 Oct 2014
 F18967  I50580  Charles Gary Cooke  I50582    MRP Tree 30 Sep 2014
 F18966  I50580  Charles Gary Cooke  I50581    MRP Tree 30 Sep 2014
 F30381  I863  Robert Winslow Marshall  I136434  22 Apr 2002  MRP Tree 30 Sep 2014
 F30379  I136341  Henry Squire      MRP Tree 30 Sep 2014
 F12254  I136340  Edward Berkeley      MRP Tree 30 Sep 2014
 F1829  I4319  William Romney  I136335    MRP Tree 30 Sep 2014
 F42463  I129711  William Jefferson "Bill" Clinton  I117657  11 Oct 1975  MRP Tree 30 Sep 2014
 F43659  I153279  Ronald Wilson Reagan  I137414  24 Jan 1940  MRP Tree 30 Sep 2014